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. this is by the way his first visit to china either as president of the united states or as a private citizen. what the white house said is look if we are going to come to china, of course, we will come to beijing and have high level meetings there but we would also like to do an event in shanghai. it is undoubtedly the most western leaning of the cities in china. a go-go modern city. the commercial center of gravity throughout all of asia and the white house said we want to have something there a little less controlled and has a little less protocol and formality and have an event with some of the students in the overall shanghai region. the white house describes the students as the future leaders of china. the president wants to show them and the larger chinese community is that there can be give and take between the united states and china that is not so controlled. whether it is over human rights, economics, military strategy or a wide range of issues, global climate change would be another and that is one of the underlying motives for the white house in putting together the event, town hall, p
liabilitys of the medicare and social security systems, the position of the united states verges on bankruptcy. because although we have a $10 trillion debt, the unfunded liabilities are $100 trillion. that's something that seems to me one can't likely dismiss. >> rose: a program note. we intended to show you this evening interviews with our friends malcolm glad well and job john grisham but because of the economic story, we will show you those interviews at a later time. tonight, orszag and ferguson when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: peter orszag is here, he is the director of the office of management and budget. called more than just the budget director by the "new yorker" magazine, he's deeply involved in president obama's ambitious domestic agenda as well. that includes health care, energy policy and entitlement reform. he's focus tong country's long-term fiscal health. the administration recently released projections showing deficits growing by $9 trillion over the next ten years. sp
people, including ethnic and religious minority, whether they are in the united states, china or any nation. >> but even as the president called for access to information, china was tightly controllg it. the meeting with a carefully screened group of students who were coached beforehand was not broadcast live across the country, and while it was available on two big national internet sites, it was hard to hear. and one big website, the xinhua news agency told people that the obamauñ÷ live, but then on the screen apparently fails to deliver on that promise. in tonight's "lead focus," we take an in depth look at the obama visit and its significance, beginning with the presidents day from melissa chan of al jazeera english. >> reporter: the president is now in beijing, but earlier in the day, he was in shanghai for his town hall meeting. it's the favorite format for the american president, a conversation with the people, talking about u.s./china relations. >> our world is now fundamentally interconnected. the jobs we do, the prosperity we build, the environment we protect, the securit
of the united states verges on bankruptc because although we have a $10 trillion debt, the unfunded liabilities are $100 trillion. at's something that sms to me one c't likel dismiss. >> ros a program note. we iended to show you this eving interviews with our friends malcolm glad well and jojohn grism but because of theconomic story, w will show you those interviews at a later time. tonigh orszag and ferguson when we continue. captioningponsored by se communications om our studios in new york city, this is chlie rose. >> ros peter orszag is here, he ithe director of the oice ofanagement and budget. called more than just the budget rector by the "new yorker" magazine, he' deeply invved in psident obama's ambitious dostic agenda as well. that includes healt care, ener policy and entitlement reform. he's focus tong country's long-term fiscal healt the ministration rently released pjections showing defici growing by $9 trillio over the nex ten years. speaking at new york uversity earlier today, peter orszag sai the government is permitted to putting the cntry back on firm fiscal footi. i'm pleased
think the with the can make? >> i think the intent is first to show the united states is very serious about the energy and climate issue, number one. number two, copenhagen, as president rasmussen has said, since congress won't be able to address the energy and climate bill until after copenhagen that it's a framework for all countries -- let me say that he proposed you expect going in, a framework that will say this is our goal, this is going to be towards a lelie binding treaty. we're not going to get there in copenhagen but this is the step we need to take in order to get there. the good news is there's a lot of motion going on and i am encouraged that a lot of countries are beginning to say, considering where we were five years ago and beyond, things are looking very positive. >> mr. secretary, the white house on wednesday also announced that it would offer a 20/20 emissions cut proposal 17% below 2005 levels. and described this proposal as a provisional proposal, earlyly contingent on congress enacting this legislation. what happens if the congress doesn't enact legislation? >> w
. but tonight, the question will be what our esteemed analysts think about the future of the united states as we stand here at the end of 2009. we really have an extraordinary group of panelists. let me just share their introduction so everyone knows who they are. i have learned that people like introductions. certainly, i like it louise gives me that wonderful introduction. we will first hear from richard haas, counsel for relations, who has worked with two presidents. as council president, he has truly been an entrepreneurial leader. it has always been important, but richard has he brought many scholars and expertise and wide range of subjects. his most recent book is called a " war of necessity, war of joyce," -- "war of necessity, war of choice." glenn hubbard is no ordinary academic. he is dean of columbia business and a tenured professor of finance and economics at the columbia school of arts and sciences. he has worked for the treasury and as a consultant to the federal reserve bank, and recently he wrote a book called "healthy, wealthy, and wise -- five steps to better health care system
interact with the rest of the taxode heren the united states. anwe don't have a value-added tax. so,gain, i don... again, it's been dcussed in academic circles. i ha not heard serious policy diussion of it en coming from citol hill. so it seems likeore of an academic idea at thi point tn an idea that's directlyn the mix in terms of policy. >> rose: what's going to be the biggest contributoto dicit reduction? >> well, over the long term i thk we need to be ver clear that it is not possible t tax your way out of the fcal trajectory that we're on. and further more,it's not possible to reduce spending outside of health care sufficientlyo addressur.... >> re: that means defse d... >> rht. our longerm fiscal problem is dispportionately influenced by the rate at which heah care costs grow. >> rose: right. >> over th next five or ten years, the sittion is a little bit different and the mixmay vary. buover the next 20, 30, 40, 70 100 years, the key thing is lping to reducehe rate of growth in health ce cts. wiout that, notng elsee do will matr. >> ros and so the bill is that's goi to come out of the
emigrating to the united states. it was a great magnet for talent for canada. i came and went to graduate school in the united states. ended up owing $500 to my law school and i had like a -year-old chevrolet and had a wonderful experience in this country. it is open in many ways, that are so unique to this country and to this culture and it was pacific northwestly clear to me why anybody with energy and talent would want to move here, because of the opportunities that were created not just in terms of economic opportunities but just in general. -- perfectly clear to me why anybody with energy and would want want to move here. it was much less -- there is much less prejudice in this society. merit and talent was a much more important quotient but have i to say that despite all of this experience that would have and has made me very optimistic on so many levels, i have developed an increasing sense of pessimism about where we are going in the future. future. . re ng in the future. the main reason for that, frankly, is the propensity of the american system now to produce weekly -- leadershi
and india and the rest of east asia and these companies can be located in the united states, europe, japan. anywhere. you got to look at it company by company to try to latch on to some of this growth we're seeing coming out of asia. >> let me talk about the united states, the market has soared about 60% since march. really which was the bottom, of course. now hitting 13 month highs this week alone. do you think there's still room to go up? if i wanted to enter this market, put new capital to work right now is that worthwhile or have i missed. >> it's >> you haven't missed it at all. what people don't realize is how much the market pell in point terms and between october 9th of 2007 and march 9th of 2009 the s&p 500 fell by 888 points. we still regained less than half of those points lost. so there's still more money on the table than we've gotten back so far. so i know people would have liked to have gotten in hard. even if they didn't there's still opportunity for good gains in stocks in the united states over the next few years. >> what about the large sort of structural issues the u.s.
is to understand the circumstances that are going on right now in terms of the compromise of the united states sovereignty by what's happening to the dollar with deficits budget to be positive so the last third of this book is solutions. what we can do as a subtitle says fighting new world order, surviving the global depression and preserving u.s. sovereignty. so the themes of this book at the last third or to give solutions and call to action for how we can organize our lives, how we can organize politically in order to fight back to say no to a global new deal. now, to get everyone's mind of around the idea of america for sale, i like to start at this way. we currently have page 24 of the book and document we have got about a 65.5 trillion what the t negative net worth. now what that means, that is according to the department treasury's own statistics. once a year the deeper and the treasury does a gap accounting and david walker, who was the head of the government accountability office actually resigned in 2008 it went on the week up to our alarming people, telling people essentially that i
how the united states may change this influence, address this national security deficiencies him and provide global leadership in an era when the american economy may not be the overwhelming source of power it once was. increasingly, national influence will be determined by whether the countries can contribute to solving global problems or at lease whether they are making themselves indispensable to other nations. china and other developing economies are demanding a greater say in the management of the world economy through the g20 and other mechanisms. china's global leverage has increased as it liberally positioned itself as a creditor nation with more than 20% of the world current account balance surplus. we cannot depend invasively on china investing heavily in the united states government that. some thought must be given to how we work with china and other nations to establish a more sensible global balance that depends less on demand by american consumers. the united states in the g20 also must rethink the role of the international financial institutions that provide crisis
chance to mention just exactly what we do in the united states that t china. in the-- the minut& >> bill planning with the pres thank you very much. now here's maggie.-- >>> a drug. millions take zetia by merck, but renewing questions about whether it our dr. jennifer ashton is here with go y- this at length this morning b- becauecause so many people do take this this journ 200& for 14 months. som- others were taking an over the counter vitamin. wh >> had cardiovascular risk factors or t attack - they were already on a stat & - pconcont
that the future of the united states and asia is inextricably linked. >> president obama is in asia threw next week with stops in tokyo, singapore, shanghai, beijing. so who get as the lion's share of obama's time? china. three days out of nine replicating what happened recently at the u.n. where the president of china and president obama were closeted for 90 minutes. this time allocation speaks for itself. and if there is any doubt remaining, obama's description of the u.s./chinese relationship clears it up. >> the relationship between the united states and china will shape the 21st century, which makes it as important bilateral relationship in the world. >> question. what must president obama accomplish in china this coming week? pat? >> he'll have to rebalance the trade relationship between the united states and china. the last ten years, the chinese have had a $2 trillion surplus. we've experted to them jobs, factories, money, technology, and that's one of the reasons why we've got this financial crisis and the dollar's in such trouble. what he's got to do is convince the chinese that this
of the world is, the united states and through president obama to announce our intentions and our way forward. but they have a deep understanding of why this is important for nato, why this is important for the larger international community. and i think that given the right measures of accountability that we need to be seeking from president karzai and his government, we're going to see a commitment not just from germany but from many of our nato allies. >> rose: might they make up whatever the gap is between what general mcchrystal is seeking and what the united states is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, i think we have to wait for the president's announcement. but we will be, as we have been, consulting very deeply our allies and talking about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civilian strategy. because, remember it's not just about troops on the ground, it's about making sure that the people of afghanistan see the results of this effort. that they have more faith in their own government as of... as an entity that can deliver for th
chief for "alternate." will also talk with a guest about the united states effort to resolve longstanding difference between israelis and palestinians. also note tim brown of the 9/11 network coalition. he will be here to talk was about the december 5 rally in new york against bernanke 9/11 suspects to a federal courthouse in lower manhattan. . . american icons, continues tonight at 8:00 p.m., with the history, art and architecture of the most symbolic structures, tonight at 8:00 p.m. on c-span and get your own copy of american icons, a three-disk set, $24.95. order on-line at c-span.org/store. now a look back at cuban missile crisis, with kennedy advisors ted sornson and carol kasem. from the kennedy library in boston, this is an hour and 15 minutes. this war policy was done in secret and steps were taken to deceive us by every means they could. they were planning in november to open to the world the fact that they had these missiles so close to the united states, not that they are with intending to fire them, because if they were going to get into a niewg clear struggle, th
. one country's success need not co at the expense of another. that is why the united states insists we do not seek to contn china's rise. on the contrary, we welcome ina as a stron and prosperous and sucssful member o the community of nations. >> reporter: answering a qution on internet access ina -- >> unrestcted internet access a source ofrength, and i thinshould be encouraged. i think that the morereely formation flows, the stronger the society beces because tn citizens of countries around the world can hold their own governmes accountable. ey can begin tohink for themselves that generates new ideas. >> reporter: and disssing cooperation on climate change -- >> the united stat and china are th world's two larst emitters of greenhous ges, of carbon that is causing the planet to warm. so unls both of ou countries are willg to take critical steps in dealing with this issue, we wil not be able to resolve it. >> reporter: there's no down china d the u.s. wil be v to workogether on a variety of world problems, but don't expect any major announcements fro this visit. after shangi, the pres
, the answer is i would probably start with something different from what we have in the united states. there is a wonderful book out there called "the healing of america," by a washington post reporter. what we have in the united states is an amalgam of the worst, that just about all of the system that you talked about, we have a little bit from this one, a little bit bad from this one, etc. so you end up with something that cims it is the best health care in the world when the statistics say it is pretty pathetic, the quality of health care and united states. >> you are saying the medicine is pathetic, so what about care? >> the medicine is pathetic, the results are pathetic. and the costs are exorbitant. >> that is very depressing. >> what happens then is that it gets demagogued to death. that is what we're seeing right now. the old things that scare people into tea parties, and from the left, things that are unrealistic. you end up in the same state of political paralysis, and the united states gets into deeper trouble providing something that should be a fundamental right in this
, john, because i don't think it will get through the united states senate. there's a reason for that, john. al gore's moment has come and gone. the truth is, they are changing the nile to climate change rather than global warming for a reason. for ten years, the earth has been cooling. 1998 or so was the hottest year. the polar bear population is doing fine. antarctica is growing, the ice cap is growing. the arctic ice cap has stopped shrinking. you look around the united states, you are having record cold trends. you have this tremendous real problem in the american economy as opposed toed mythical problem of global warming. for these reasons, john, i think it's not going to get through the senate. i think, as i say, al gore's moment has passed. this whole thing was a bit of a hoax designed to transfer power from individuals and wealth to governments and from governments to transnational, international corporations, global institutions. that time has come, and it has gone. >> eleanor? >> that was both a minority view and paranormic view that it's all a conspiracy to transfer power.
's meetg, "the new york tis" noted e range of issues on whic the united state was asking for china's help. somethinthat might have been thinkable, it sa,efore the united states became embroiled in two wars a bfore the u. onomy was hbbled bythe global financialrisis that began on ishores. those issu inclu the wde trade ga between the two countries, redung greenhouse gas emiions, as well as iran and its nuclear program. prident obama alsobrgh up with the dai lama,he a exiled leader of tibet. beyond a show of goodill and a prome to work o big issues, no breakthrous were reported. but in tonight's "leadfocus," we wt to show you how the issue was cvered by theenglish language cnnel of chinese ate television. >> reporter: presint hu jintao has met with barack obama in beijing. they haveledged fortronger cooperion and to findore mm ground deite their differces. their discusons also focused on global challengesndhe wod economy has a solid recove. >> ts is the third formal meetingetween pesident ji andao barack obama this year th the interests of e world'sargesteveloping and develed nations. the t
of the world's challenges cannot be solved unless the united states and china work together rts. >> reporter: but there was another challenge, how to address china's record on human rights. the president broached the topic at a town hall meeting with university students in shanghai earlier in the day. >> we do not seek to impose any system of government on any other nation. but we also don't believe that the principless that we stand for are unique to our nation. these freedoms of expression and worship, of access to information and political participation, we believe, are universal rights. they should be available to all people, including ethnic and religious minorities whether they are in the united states, china or any nation. >> reporter: following past practice for such events chinese authorities detained dozens of human rights activists in advance of the president's visit. mr. obama did not mention the crackdown but he did chide the chinese government for internet censorship. china has 250 million internet users but also employs the world's tightest controls over web access. >> i am a
of the pope. the religion spread to russia, greece, eastern europe and more recently to the united states. today orthodoxy remains one of the most popular form of christianity. his all holiness was born in 1940 on the turkish island of'm bruce. his father was a barbershop owner. he enrolled in a theological school graduating with high honors in 1961. on october 22, 1991, he was elected the 270th archbishop of constantinople. he was enthroned in the patriarchal cathedral in istanbul. from the beginning he has been on a mission to modernize the church and make it more relevant. early on, he became identified with environmentalism by incorporating yet into his spiritual message, he has preached in the spirit of dialogue and understanding among all religions. while there are chrez yas cal differences with the catholic church, he has met with the pope several times. he had several meets with john paul in the 1990s and met with benedict in turkey. he's met with leaders around the world, including fidel castro and moammar qaddafi. his holeryness is well known in america having received the congr
important to the united states? >>> india is going to be central to what we want to do in the world. >>> also, a disturbing new trend. police say they can't keep track of all of the registered sex offenders. there are just too many to keep an eye on. the internet provides easy prey. how can you keep your family safe? >>> good evening, and thanks for joining us. at this hour, we're waiting for the prime minister of india, manmohan singh, to arrive at the white house. president obama and the first lady will pay invitation to the first dinner. the list includes hollywood stars and business chiefs. 320 people will gather under a white house tent in the south lawn. singer jennifer hudson will headline the event. the symphony orchestra and the marine band will also perform. earlier today, president obama met with the indian prime minister and called them natural allies. topping the topics, global warming and trade. president obama has promised to visit india next year. >>> now to president obama's big decision on the war in afghanistan. the president said today he plans on finishing the j
>>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show wan exclusive interview with maziar bahari "the newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he's written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new deli where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmolian singh. let's get started. everyone has forgotten you, those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confine in the an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek" he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to $300,000 american dollars. he flew back to his home in london just days before his wife paola ga
square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show with an exclusive interview with maziar bahari, the "newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he has written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new delhi where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmohan singh. in his only television interview on his trip to washington, d.c. let's get started. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> everyone has forgotten you. those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confinement in an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek." he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to 300,000 american d
with the united states both economic and security. the obama administration really doesn't want to revisit all of that, but president obama said on the record he understand that a new party coming to power will want to take a look at all the underlying agreements negotiated with the united states by the liberal democratic party. the big issues that will be on the table between these two leaders -- climate change, north korea, and trade. one other issue, of course, is afghanistan with the democratic party of japan came in, the prime minister decided to end a long-standing refueling operation the japanese were conducting with vessels in the indian ocean. but in exchange, the japanese government has put up funds in reconstruction aid. botin the main, this summit, the second time the two leaders have met is not going to produce any new u.s.-japanese announcement on any of the issues i discussed but it will be an opportunity for the two to discuss trade, north korea and climate change. steve: major, just a moment ago the white house office of the press secretary released something. apparently the u
karzai can become the effective leader that the united states hopes for and needs in afghanistan. can he rid the country of corruption? can he raise an army capable one day of taking over from the unitedtates? these are all key questions as president obama plans the next phase of u.s. involvement in afghanistan. in our lead focus, the afghan election and beyond. we start in kabul with jonah hull of al jazeera english who found that the issue of fraud remains an undercurrent. >> reporter: just a day after dr. abdullah's withdrawal from the race, hamid karzai is declared winner of afghanistan's presidential election. >> translator: we declare mr. hamid karzai, who got the majority votes in the first round, and who is the only candidate in the second round, be declared president of afghanistan. >> repter: the chairman of the country's top electoral body, the independent election commission, said consensus had be reached among his commissioners baseon the law and in the interests of the afghan people. international reaction was led by united nations secretary ban ki-moon in kabul on an unann
, they said, take care of yourself to get reelected. >> the opposite of a democrat in the united states, the difference is a conservative, not a republican. you cannot be -- a republican if you are not against big spending. >> keep thinking that. >> here is what i would say. what i would say is, look at virginia. bob macdonald reached over, not by moderating his principles, but by saying that his principles were not only good for saying, no. he says he wants to grow the economy, but he just wants us to do it, not washington. there is a positive, republican agenda out there. we will see more of that in 2010. >> when i first opted to propose the question, this was slightly more off-base. i want to bring up the idea. i came down here from boston, where republican was a dirty word. not because of the belief system but the reputation. my question is how much opinion is placed in the word, republican or democrat. and how much is in the ideology. how much will this affect things over the last year? how much has that changed? >> it is an interesting attachment to the word republican, as there i
would be investigated. this is one many flawed parts of the resolution. the united states will remain a true friend to our ally, israel. so let us call for an open and honest debate with the reputable justice goldstone. let us not act in haste to pass a resolution that in no way achieve our ultimate goal of achieving a lasting peace for israelis and palestinians. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from minnesota is recognized. mr. ellison: may i inquire as to the time remaining? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has one 3/4 minutes remaining. mr. ellison: i yield one minute to the gentleman from massachusetts. >> i ask permission to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> this resolution should not be coming before us. there is an anti-israel bias in the united nations, but it should be the responsibility of every member of this house to bring it back to the peace talk table. this resolution does not do that. this resolution heightens the rhetoric of division. regardless of what you think of the goldstone report, it makes an
they could actually make a difference with the ballot. >> the united states needs to say to the world we have to solve the problem of our continuing confrontation with the muslim world it has undermined the success of president after president. and we cannot continue that way. we have to find a way to overcome that barrier and therefore israel has to see itself in the context of the whole western alliance. >> rose: friedman, rogan, cohen next. >> funding for charlie rose has been provided by the following. >> each day a billion people won't find safe drinking water. around the world we're helping communitites to access clean water. working to improve lives through conservation and education. one drop at a time. >> additional funding for charlie rose was also provided by these funders. . >> and by bloomberg, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this was a big week in diplomacy for president oa. last night he returned from a week long visit to asia it took him to j
and shakers of the united states of america. that is why i am here. that is why i am doing this luncheon. i feel like -- the gratitude is out of this world right now for having me do this. it really quick, i want to thank everybody for this honor. i want to thank you for inviting me to speak. the recorders of the industry and all of the change agents, you, the press, has a very special responsibility, and that is to be a mirror for us to see ourselves, our community, our country, and the rest of the world, and a truly respect the rule that you play in our system. i am sure that many of you are asking why would i want to speak at the national press club in washington, d.c., and why would they invite me? i make my living by stringing together verses or playing a part in some movie or television series that you may all have seen, "law and order," by the way. what would ludacris have to say? what would i have to say about leadership? i am going to say a lot of different things, so take what i say a word for word. you wonder if i plan to run for office, maybe for president in 2012. you do not ha
. . every industrialized country has that system except the united states. we are going to change that. national polls show that the majority of doctors and the majority of americans favor a single payer system. that is why six months ago, we went to capitol hill. when senator baucus opened that first day of hearing in may, i stood up and said, excuse me, sir, why have you taken single payer off the table? why have you not allowed one doctor testify for single payer? baucus ordered us arrested. one by one, margaret, kevin, carol, and four others stood up and confronted baucus. and one by one we were all arrested and charged with disruption of congress. in a plea deal earlier this year, we agreed not to disrupt congress throughout the end of this year. since that day in may, baucus and harry reid in the senate, and nancy pelosi and steny hoyer in the house have cobbled together incomprehensible legislation. it is convoluted and confusing. but one thing is clear -- president obama and the democrats have cut a dirty deal with the health insurance and pharmaceutical industries. obama took
effect. a recent study by our national academy of sciences found that here in the united states burning fossil fuels leads to almost 120 billion dollars in health costs a year. most of those costs are premature deaths, and we know that the cost in human lives can be even higher in countries we merging economies that have fewer resources to improve air quality. for all of these reasons, president obama and i understand that we cannot wait any longer to act. president obama has made it clear that he's committed to passing comprehensive energy and climate legislation that will create millions of new jobs and secure clean energy sources that are made in america and work for america. but in the meantime, we're looking for ways that we can start reducing this threat right now. last friday i saw some of you at a white house stakeholder briefing i hosted with lisa jackson, the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefing we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area from funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to invest
service is enshrined in the constitution of the united states. we have a law that says the postal service should produce universal service. we have to maintain a basic service. host: joseph, independent caller. caller: one of the previous callers mentioned at the topic -- the vending machines. i look forward to going to the post office now with dread. one local post office has a giant hole in the wall covered with plywood where the vending machines used to be. when i asked one of the minister why they were gone. she said it was cost control. there's no way it can be more efficient to have all those people waiting in line. it makes no sense to me. there's something seriously wrong with the reasoning behind this kind of decision. i have seen it across the board. they're using space in the post offices for selling packages that have teddy bears and balloons on them. they should be sticking to basics, common-sense service. if i can avoid going to the post office, i will do it. they might as well -- it is just a nightmare. it is a baffling ordeal. guest: i am sorry to your use say that. you ar
is that the financial crisis of last year has shaken the chinese perception of the ability of the united states to run the international system so that the chinese are becoming-- especially in the economic field-- a lot more assertive than they have ever been before. >> rose: we conclude this evening with melinda gates talking about global health, the bill and melinda gates foundation, and the relationship between the two of them. >> i just can't tell you how when, you know, i'll come back from the developing world, the first person i want to talk to and the first person that wants to talk to me is bill. he wants to hear what i've learned, hear what i'm excited about, i want to tell him what i'm excited about, tell him what i saw, tell him what isn't going as well as we thought. and the same thing. when he comes from northern nigeria, he wants to tell me what he saw, what's going to be hard, how do we think about this? to be doing that together is both satisfying but to be working on something that you're so deeply passionate about and that uses every piece of your mind and your heart. it does, it giv
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